Things that bother me: Improper capitalization

I can’t recall when I learned how to capitalize letters in school. It must have been somewhere in early elementary school.

Capitalization comes at the beginning of a sentence, or in the case of a proper noun. First-person pronouns are capitalized, such as I, I’ll, or I’m, as are places and geographic terms

Some adjectives should be capitalized, like Christian, or Canadian.

Acronyms should be capitalized. CPR is acceptable, while cpr is not. (See, I have the squiggly line underneath cpr in my word processor.)

Changing the capitalization of a word can even change the meaning of a word. For example, Alpine, which refers to the Alps, and alpine, which relates to growing or living in a mountainous area, such as a plant. Cancer is an astrological sign, or a constellation, whereas cancer is a class of diseases.

Capitalization can also change the pronunciation of a word. As in Nice, which is a location in France, pronounced ['ni:s], and nice, which means pleasing, or kind, and is pronounced [nahys].

But Some People Think It Is Acceptable To Type A Sentence Out Like This, As If Every Word Is A Freaking Proper Noun, Or Some Other Type Of Word That Deserves A Majuscle At The Beginning Of It.

Or, even worse, there are people WHO INSIST ON TYPING IN ALL CAPS, APPARENTLY OBLIVIOUS TO THE NOTION THAT THEY ARE YELLING.

Improper capitalization drives me bonkers.

Comments

  1. Mark Whitehead says:

    LOVE IT!!!!! :-)

    I started to learn about capitalisation when I was about 6-7 years of age. By the time I was 10, my teacher would have come down really heavily on me if I’d misused caps. (As his name was Charles Laughton, you did what he said!)

    Sure, I’ve got things wrong from time to time. Also, there are times when capitalisation is no longer essential. In the UK, we have the National Examination Board in Occupational Safety and Health – NEBOSH. However, this is often written as “Nebosh” as that’s how it is now pronounced (“Nee-boche”).

    In emails etc, I only use all upper-case when I want to let the other person know I’m shouting. That’s rare, as I don’t often shout at people!

  2. Insert joke about the difference between helping your Uncle Jack off a horse and…

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